Biological Invasion and Protected Areas

Ladybird

Biological invasion and protected areas

Protected areas (parks) are not immune to being invaded by alien plants and animals, but the ecological risks can be high when this happens. Alien and invasive species enter parks via a wide range of pathways and many hypotheses have been proposed to explain what makes a park either susceptible or resistant to invasion. Our research in this area focuses on both drivers and patterns of alien and invasive species invasion, the long term consequences of the integration of multiple alien species into native communities and the management implications thereof.

Examples of our work in this area:

Human population density explains alien species richness in protected areas.

  • Spear, D., Foxcroft, L.C., Bezuidenhout, H. & McGeoch, M.A. 2013. Human population density explains alien species richness in protected areas. Biological Conservation 159, 137-147. 10.1016/j.biocon.2012.11.022

Human activities, propagule pressure and alien plants in the sub-Antarctic: Tests of generalities and evidence in support of management.

  • Le Roux, P.C., Ramaswiela, T., Kalwij, J.M., Shaw, J.D., Ryan, P.G., Treasure, A.M., McClelland, G.T.W., McGeoch, M.A. & Chown, S.L. 2013. Human activities, propagule pressure and alien plants in the sub-Antarctic: Tests of generalities and evidence in support of management. Biological Conservation 161, 18-27. 10.1016/j.biocon.2013.02.005 

Uncertainty in invasive alien species listing.

  • McGeoch, M.A., Spear, D., Kleynhans, E.J. & Marais, E. 2012. Uncertainty in invasive alien species listing. Ecological Applications 22, 959-971. 10.1890/11-1252.1 

Collaborators:
Dr Llewellyn Foxcroft 
Associate Professor Ros Gleadow 
Dr Dave Chapple
Dr Gillis Horner

Related links:
Invasive Species Specialist Group
Global Invasive Alien Species Information Partnership
Parks Victoria 
South African National Parks